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According to new research released Tuesday, many employees and managers in the United States and United Kingdom value trust in the workplace more than financial compensation.

A survey of 500 workers and managers in the US and UK by Osterman Research for cybersecurity firm Cerbi found that nearly half of participants (47%) said they would take a 20% pay cut in exchange for higher trust by their employer.

Other characteristics the researchers found highly prized by employees included flexibility (48%), autonomy (42%), and being able to choose the applications needed to work effectively (39%).

The State of Employee Trust Report by Osterman and Cerby examines the impact of zero-trust principles that many companies are increasingly adopting as a solution to their cyber security needs as a result of the use of “unmanageable applications” by workers and managers.

“Apps are closely linked to the level of employee engagement and empowerment. If employers try to block apps, which they often do, it negatively affects trust,” in San Francisco said Matt Chiodi, chief trust officer at Cerbi, a zero-trust architecture provider for unmanaged applications located at .

“Sixty percent of employees said that if an application they want is blocked, it negatively affects how they feel about the company,” Chiodi told TechNewsWorld.

“The answer is not for employers to block these apps, but to find solutions that allow these unmanageable apps to be managed,” he said.

fret over control

Security teams resent the use of unmanaged applications, also known as shadow IT, for a number of reasons. “Employees come and go. An organization can end up with thousands of unused credentials accessing its resources,” explained Szilwezter Szebeny, CISO and co-founder of Tresorit, an email encryption-based security solutions company in Zurich.

“With a mountain of passive access, hackers are bound to find something that will go unnoticed and pave the way for them to infiltrate the organization through lateral movement,” Szebeny told TechNewsWorld.

Unsupportable applications can put an organization at risk because it has no control over the security practices imposed on the programs’ development and management, said John Yoon, vice president of product strategy at ColorTokens, an autonomous zero-trust cybersecurity solutions provider in San Jose. Caliph.

“In addition, the organization has no oversight of the applications’ security update requirements,” Yoon told TechNewsWorld.

Without any control over the application, organizations can’t trust it with access to their environments, said Mike Parkin, a senior technical engineer at Vulkan Cyber, a provider of SaaS for enterprise cyber risk prevention in Tel Aviv, Israel.

“Letting employees choose the best tool for the job, especially when it’s running on their own device, is welcome,” Parkin told TechNewsWorld.

However, he stressed, “this requires some compromise with the organization choosing the application and the employees willing to give up if their preferred app is not on the approved list.”

Clearwater, Fla. Roger Grimes, data-driven defense evangelist at KnowBe4, a security awareness training provider in the U.S., took a hard look at the issue.

“It’s up to an organization’s cybersecurity risk managers to determine whether the risks incurred are worth the benefits,” Grimes told TechNewsWorld. “You don’t want the average end user to decide what is or isn’t risky for the organization any more than you want the average passenger flying an airplane.”

worth the risk?

The applications are considered unmanageable because they often don’t support common security measures, such as single sign-on and automatically adding or removing users, Chiody explained.

“It presents a risk to a business, but business users still need those applications,” he said. “Businesses need to find ways to get those applications to the point where they can be managed, so that those risks are reduced.”

Labeling applications unmanageable is misleading, says Marcus Smiley, CEO of Epoch Concepts, an IT solutions provider in Littleton, Colo.

“They’re built without support for modern, industry security standards, which makes them harder to monitor and secure,” Smiley told TechNewsWorld, “but means they can’t be managed like other applications.” , they can be managed in different ways. ,

“When unmanageable applications are being used, there is always some reason,” he said. “Many organizations need better communication between IT and employees to clarify company policies and the reasons behind them.”

“IT should also provide channels for requesting applications and be proactive in providing more secure options for problematic ones,” he added.

Smiley said that in some situations, allowing unmanaged applications with oversight is appropriate to ensure that best-identity-management practices and more secure configurations are implemented instead of less secure ones.

“Ultimately, there is no such thing as a risk-free cyber security strategy,” he added. “Every security program – even those that fall under zero trust – involves trade-offs between mission-critical business functionality, productivity and risk.”

balancing act needed

The safest approach is to have any application reviewed prior to adoption by an individual or team with cyber security expertise to identify any issues that may arise from the use of the software or service, ensure that Assuming the legal terms are acceptable, as well as a plan for ongoing maintenance, recommended Chris Clements, vice president of solutions architecture at Cerberus Sentinel, a cybersecurity consulting and penetration testing company in Scottsdale, Ariz.

“Unfortunately, many organizations do not have the expertise or resources to properly assess these risks, resulting in the process not happening at all, or as bad, taking weeks or months,” Clements told TechNewsWorld. which hurts employee morale and productivity.” ,

“Balancing cyber security risk with employee needs is a practice that organizations need to take more seriously,” he said. “Allowing a Wild West approach will inevitably introduce cyber security risks. But on the other hand, being overly rigid can lead to choosing product or service solutions that heavily compromise usability and user convenience or completely Deny approval from.

“These can create frustration and lead personnel to leave the organization or actively subvert security controls,” he continued.

Misusing zero-trust principles can also add to that frustration. “Zero trust is for data, access, applications and services,” Chiodi argued. “But when it comes to building trust on the human side, companies should aim for higher trust. The two are not mutually exclusive. It’s possible, but there’s going to be a shift in how employers use security controls.”

“By giving employees technology choices, companies can show that they trust their employees to make technology decisions that help them do their jobs better,” says Allegro Solutions, a cybersecurity consulting company in West Hartford, Conn. Principal Karen Walsh said.

“By reinforcing it with education around the mindset of compromising,” they build a stronger relationship with the members of their workforce, Walsh told TechNewsWorld.

Apple’s 2022 Worldwide Developers Conference on Monday revealed the latest versions of the company’s own mobile and desktop operating systems, in kickoff of its annual week-long virtual high-tech show targeting developers and the Apple consumer experience .

The event showcased Apple’s major software updates to iOS 16, as well as updates to iPadOS, macOS for the company’s computers, and watchOS 9 for the Apple Watch.

Presentations highlighted the new MacBook Air with a 13.6-inch screen and Liquid Retina Display, as well as a new 13-inch MacBook Pro – both with enhancements powered by the new M2 Apple silicon chip.

This year’s conference was Apple’s first major opportunity to introduce some of its new product lines based on its processor designs.

Apple CEO Tim Cook claimed during his opening remarks that these platforms and the products they run provide amazing experiences for users and provide developers with incredible opportunities to create, build and develop apps that will change the world. to use their superpowers to cooperate. ,

“WWDC is designed to give this community what they need to do their best work. We love to support our developers beyond WWDC with extensive world-class support,” Cook said during the virtual keynote. said during

One particularly impressive announcement revealed the ability to use an iPhone as a webcam. A clip-on attachment will let users secure an iPhone to the top of a computer screen and there will be instant integration for FaceTime and other videoconferencing apps via the Continuity camera features.

macOS Ventura Continuity Camera Lets iPhone Act As Webcam

Continuity Camera uses an iPhone as a webcam on a Mac for videoconferencing. (image credit: Apple)


Developing developer community

Cook summarized Apple’s efforts to grow the developer community. This support for developers extends to several important initiatives.

One is the recently opened Developer Center across from Apple Park where developers can connect with Apple engineers and reach their global community. Another fall came with Apple’s first online tech talk for developers to learn more about new technologies and connect directly with Apple engineers in live sessions and one-on-one office hours.

“We are also committed to developing the next generation of developers, including through our efforts to reach underrepresented communities,” Cook said.

Apple’s Entrepreneur Camps include female, black and Latin founders and provide advice, inspiration and insight from Apple to developers from underrepresented communities.

The company started developer academies to teach students the fundamentals of code and other essential skills to find and create jobs in the app economy. These 17 coding centers are located around the world.

For example, last October Apple launched a racial equality and justice initiative in Detroit. In Saudi Arabia, Apple launched its first ever developer academy for women in February.

“We are pleased to say that we have expanded our developer community to over 34 million Apple developers,” Cook said. “Today we are going to advance our platform more than ever before for our developers and our users.”

macOS Extended Access

macOS Ventura, the latest version of the desktop operating system, takes the Mac experience to a whole new level with many integrated innovative features.

Stage Manager gives Mac users a new way to stay focused on the primary task while seamlessly switching between apps and windows.

Continuity Camera uses the iPhone as a webcam on the Mac to do things that weren’t possible before. Handoff comes to FaceTime, allowing users to initiate an iPhone or iPad call and pass it on to their Macs fluidly.

Mail and Messages gets new features that enhance the performance of apps. The Safari browser transitions into a passwordless future with Passkey.

“MacOS Ventura includes powerful features and new innovations that help make the Mac experience even better. New tools like Stage Manager make focusing on tasks and moving between apps and Windows easier and faster than ever before , and the Continuity Camera brings new videoconferencing features to any Mac, including Desk View, Studio Lite and more,” said Craig Federighi, Apple’s senior vice president of software engineering.

New features in Messages, cutting-edge search technology in Mail, and an updated design for Spotlight give Ventura a lot to offer and enrich the many ways customers use their Macs, he said.

Integrating Apps and Windows

The Apple software initiative brings new ways of working across apps and opens windows with Stage Manager, Continuity Camera features, and shared Safari browser tabs.

Stage Manager automatically organizes open apps and windows so users can see everything at a glance. The current window is displayed prominently in the center. Other open windows appear on the left and are easily switchable between tasks.

macOS Ventura Stage Manager

New features like Stage Manager in macOS Ventura help users stay focused. (image credit: Apple)


Users can group windows together while working on specific tasks or projects that require separate apps. Stage Manager works in conjunction with other macOS windowing tools—including Mission Control and Space—and users can now easily access their desktop with a single click.

The Shared tab group enables friends, family, and coworkers to share their favorite sites in Safari. They can see what other tabs are watching live. Users can also create a list of bookmarks on the shared start page, and even start Message conversations or FaceTime calls from Safari.

Many more sharing features

Messages on Mac can now edit or undo a recently sent message, mark a message as unread, or even recover accidentally deleted messages. New collaboration features make working with others faster and easier. For example, a user sharing a share sheet or file via Messages with drag and drop can choose to share a copy or collaborate.

If the user selects Collaboration, everyone on the message thread is automatically added. Edits for the shared document appear at the top of the thread. Users can also join SharePlay sessions from their Macs from within Messages so they can chat and participate in synchronized experiences.

Don’t count the pictures out of the picture. The new features provide a more consistent experience across Apple devices. Users can now find images in their photo library, across the system, and on the web. They can also search their photos by location, people, scenes or objects, and Live Text lets them search by text inside images.

iCloud Shared Photo Library users can now create and share a separate photo library among up to six family members. They can choose to share all of their current photos from their personal libraries, or share based on a start date or the people in the photos.

To be more productive, users can now take actions from Spotlight, such as starting a timer, creating a new document, or running a shortcut. In addition, Spotlight now includes rich results for actors, movies, actors and TV shows, as well as businesses and sports.

m2 macbook

Apple introduced a completely redesigned MacBook Air and an updated 13-inch MacBook Pro, both powered by the new M2 chip that pushes the M1’s performance and capabilities even further.

The slim design of the MacBook Air packs a large 13.6-inch Liquid Retina display, 1080p FaceTime HD camera, four-speaker sound system, up to 18 hours of battery life, and MagSafe charging.

macbook air magsafe charging

The new MacBook Air features MagSafe for dedicated charging when users are plugged in. (image credit: Apple)


It is now available in four finishes – Silver, Space Grey, Midnight and Starlight. The M2 also comes with the 13-inch MacBook Pro, which offers better performance, up to 24GB of integrated memory, ProRes acceleration, and up to 20 hours of battery life.

“Only with Apple Silicon can you create such a thin and light notebook with a fanless design and this combination of performance and capabilities,” said Greg Joswiak, Apple’s senior vice president of worldwide marketing.

“The M2 debuts the second generation of Apple’s M-series chips and extends the features of the M1. With power efficiency, unified memory architecture, and custom technology, this new chip is compatible with Apple’s most popular Mac notebooks, the MacBook Air, and the MacBook Air. The 13-inch brings even more performance and capabilities to the MacBook Pro,” he said.

MacBook Air Ports Side View

Apple’s new MacBook Air features MagSafe charging, which keeps two Thunderbolt ports available for connecting a variety of accessories. (image credit: Apple)


The new MacBook Air features a 13.6-inch Liquid Retina display, which has been angled up and around the camera to make room for the menu bar. The result is a larger display with thinner borders, offering more screen real estate.

At 500 nits brightness, it’s 25 percent brighter than previous models. In addition, the new display now supports a billion colors for more vibrant photos and movie watching.

The new MacBook Air and the updated 13-inch MacBook Pro join the 14- and 16-inch MacBook Pro with the M1 Pro and M1 Max to round out Apple’s laptop lineup.

MacBook Pro 13-inch M2

The M2 on the 13-inch MacBook Pro supports up to 24 GB of faster integrated memory and 100 Gb/s memory bandwidth for more efficient multitasking. (image credit: Apple)


Both new laptops will be available next month. Prices start at $1,199 for the MacBook Air and $1,299 for the 13-inch MacBook Pro.

watchOS 9

Apple also previewed watchOS 9, which brings new features and enhanced experiences to the wearable operating system. The Apple Watch will now have more watch faces to choose from with more complex complications that offer more detail and opportunities for personalization.

Apple Watch, watchOS 9

watchOS 9 brings new experiences and features, app updates, and creative ways to customize the Apple Watch. (image credit: Apple)


For example, the updated Workout app, advanced metrics, visualizations and training experiences inspired by high-performing athletes help users take their workouts to the next level.

watchOS 9 brings sleep stages to the Sleep app, and a new FDA-cleared AFib History feature provides deeper insight into a user’s condition. The new Medicines app makes it easy for users to manage, understand and track medicines easily and carefully.

This fall, watchOS 9 takes the Apple Watch experience to the next level with scientifically validated insights into fitness, sleep and heart health, said Jeff Williams, Apple’s Chief Operating Officer, while allowing users to build their own Apple Watch. more creative ways to do it.” Officer.